FPWA Centennial

100 Years Fighting for Justice and Equity in New York

Celebrate our centennial all year long with us.
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latest anniversary events and announcements.

 

Gov. Kathy Hochul, NYC Mayor Eric Adams, and NYC Council Speaker Adrienne Adams
salute the work of FPWA, New York’s Leading Anti-Poverty Nonprofit

 

Did You Know?

Scroll to find out more about FPWA’s history.

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Founded in 1922 as the Federation of Institutions Caring for Protestant Children, the Federation operated out of the Church Missions House, a historic landmark located at 281 Park Avenue.
 
Today, 40 Broad Street is home to the organization's policy experts, nonprofit sector leaders, and community advocates.

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In 1922, the number of homeless children without guardianship in the city had become a crisis. Few organizations existed to address the situation and their efforts were disjointed. Black and brown children in particular had few places to go. That's when our founders stepped in and rallied to the need.

 
Over the years, we continued to fight for expanded services, including early childhood literacy programs and daycare in low-income communities of color.

In 1922, the number of homeless children without guardianship in the city had become a crisis - and in particular, Black and brown children had few places to go. Our founders rallied to the need.

 
Over the following decades, we continued to fight for expanded services, including early childhood literacy programs and daycare in low-income communities of color.

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First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt applauded FPWA's anti-poverty fight in 1935

First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt applauded FPWA's anti-poverty fight in 1935

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FPWA worked with Floyd Patterson, world heavyweight boxing champion, and other famous Black celebrities to successfully recruit hundreds of foster parents for Black and Brown children throughout all five boroughs.

 

Our Most Recent Work

 

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